Alcoholics Anonymous in Cornwall

 © AA Cornwall - Alcoholics Anonymous (Great Britain) Ltd

PAGES FOR PROFESSIONALS

These Pages are dedicated to Professionals who would like to know more about Alcoholics Anonymous and what we are doing to help those suffering with Alcoholism.


Hopefully these pages will be useful for professionals involved in Counselling, Healthcare, Community Services, Education, the Legal and Criminal Justice System and the Armed Forces.
 
If you would like to know more about AA please read the most frequently asked questions by professionals
about Alcoholics Anonymous.


If you are interested in the work of AA as a professional you are welcome to attend an open meeting. Please visit the meetings page for more details about open meetings
 
You are also welcome to attend one of the Health Professionals Alcoholism Information & Awareness Sessions held regularly
at the Royal Cornwall Hospital (Treliske) and the West Cornwall Hospital (Penzance). Contact the Health Liaison Officer if you would like more information and dates and times for the next scheduled session.

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL E-MAIL DATABASE

If you would like your e-mail address added to our professional database in order to receive information about Alcohol Awareness sessions and Alcoholics Anonymous in Cornwall please click on the link below

 

ADD MY DETAILS TO THE PROFESSIONAL DATABASE
 
Your information will be confidential and will not be used for any other purpose other than to provide information that will be useful to you on a professional basis.

 

You will be kept up to date with 'Where to Find' meetings list, contact details and information about Alcohol Awareness sessions and Roadshows.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS BY PROFESSIONALS

 

IS IT CONFIDENTIAL?


Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions. Any information you share with A.A. is treated in a totally confidential manner.

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IS IT RELIGIOUS?


Alcoholics Anonymous has only one requirement for membership and that is the desire to stop drinking. There is room in AA for people of all shades of belief and non-belief. We have seen many people come to AA and refuse to accept our help because they become angry or upset when others talk of their beliefs. If you are unable to accept that others have a belief that you don’t, you will find it very difficult to come to terms with.If on the other hand you can be tolerant of other peoples' right to believe in whatever they want to,you will find others tolerant of your rights to believe whatever you choose.
 
Let’s make no bones about it; the 12 step programme that members follow has its origins in a Christian group. As a consequence you will see God mentioned quite often. Many members believe in a god, and we have members that come from and practice all sorts of religions; but also many are atheist or agnostic, so don’t be put off. Because it is a spiritual programme (not religious) those who believe in some form of divinity often find it useful to incorporate the programme into their religious practices and vice versa. This is their choice, there is absolutely no requirement. What we all have in common is that the programme helps us find an inner strength that we were previously unaware of, where we differ is attributing the source. Whatever you do, please don’t let someone else’s religious beliefs prevent you from finding the solution that is available to you through Alcoholics Anonymous.

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IS IT A CULT?


Its members are not forced to attend meetings, they are free to leave at any time and the programme of recovery is simply a list of suggestions which while many do choose to follow,also many choose to go their own way about it. The majority of members quite happily fit the culture of A.A. into their normal life and belief systems.

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MUST YOU BE ABLE TO TALK IN GROUPS AND CONFESS THAT YOU ARE AN ALCOHOLIC?


Nobody is forced or pressured to speak at an AA meeting or to declare themselves to be alcoholic. Newcomers benefit most from listening to the experience of speakers and will have the opportunity to speak to members on a one to one basis if they choose.

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 WHAT IS THE 12 STEP PROGRAMME?


It is a series of steps taken by the alcoholic which assist them to achieve and maintain sobriety. They include acceptance of the fact that they are alcoholic, learning to trust and rely on something outside of themselves for help, acknowledgement of and making amends for past behaviour, changing present behaviour and passing the help received to other alcoholics.

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CAN PEOPLE ATTEND COUNSELLING AT A TREATMENT CENTRE AND ATTEND AA?


AA members can and do attend counselling at treatment centres. Many people have come to AA through treatment centres and attend aftercare there.This continuity is useful in the recovery process.

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DOES THE AA PROGRAMME INCLUDE THE PHILOSOPHY OF RECOVERY?


AA is based around the concept of recovery from a persisting, chronic illness. It includes the philosophy elements of belief that everyone has the potential to recover and the inherent ability to lead a satisfying, useful life.

THE HEALTH SECTOR AND AA

The AA Health Liaison Officer (HLO) co-ordinates all hospital and related activities in the local area.
 The HLO establishes contact and maintains communication with health professionals and is always available if you have any questions.


If you would like more information as to how AA can help within the Health Sector please contact the Health Liaison Officer 
 

ALCOHOL AWARENESS SESSIONS


If you are a professional, somebody that works or comes into contact with those suffering with alcoholism and alcohol problems, whether it be in a mental health capacity, social,  medical, family liaison, probation, crime etc .... or would just like to know more about the illness of alcoholism and Alcoholics Anonymous please feel welcome to attend one of the sessions below. Places can be limited so if possible it would be appreciated if you could book your place. Please contact the HLO if you would like more information and dates and times for the next scheduled session.
 

A.A. FOR STAFF IN HEALTHCARE


As a professional coming into contact with alcoholism you will be well aware of its harmful effects on the individual concerned and those around them, particularly the families.


A.A. Health Liaison works with hospital and treatment centre staff, perhaps visiting someone whom a member of staff has identified as having an alcohol problem and where the individual has expressed a willingness to be visited. Many hospitals welcome A.A. meetings on their premises, where patients can be introduced to a meeting on site. Talks to doctors and nursing staff can be also arranged on request by contacting the AA General Service Office in York (01904 644026).
 

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO GET A.A. HELP FOR A PROBLEM DRINKER?


By far the best way to get help is to give them the A.A. telephone number (0800 9177 650) or to call the number while the patient or client is with you and hand them the phone. The A.A. telephone helpline is manned by A.A. members with at least one year of sobriety who will offer to arrange for a member to contact them to take them to a local meeting. A similar service is available by email, please write to help@alcoholics-anonymous.org.uk

A.A. FOR COMMUNITY SERVICES


 As a professional coming into contact with alcoholism, you will be well aware of its harmful effects on the individual concerned and those around them, particularly the families.


It is estimated that one person in 13 is dependent on alcohol in Britain - twice as many as are addicted to all other forms of drugs. Between 60-70% of men who assault their partners do so under the influence of alcohol.
 
A.A. Public Information co-operates with Community Service staff. A team of A.A. volunteers is available on request to give talks to staff who would like to better understand the help that A.A. has to offer. Contact AA General Service Office in York (01904 644026).

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO GET A.A. HELP FOR A PROBLEM DRINKER?
 
By far the best way to get help is to give them the A.A. telephone number (0845 7697 555) or to call the number while the patient or client is with you and hand them the phone.


The A.A. telephone helpline is manned by A.A. members with at least one year's sobriety who will offer to arrange for a member to contact them to take them to a local meeting.

SCHOOL TALKS AND EDUCATION

EDUCATION, YOUNG PEOPLE AND AA
 
Why is it important to give Information to schools?
 
In Cornwall 1 in 4 adults are drinking at “hazardous levels” and according to the Cornwall Alcohol  Needs Assessment, between 16 -19,000 adults are experiencing problems with alcohol if not “dependent upon alcohol”.


Alcohol is cheap and easily available and young people are attracted to it, despite legal restrictions on age of consumption and purchase.


Rates of Liver disease continue to rise decade by decade, and are affecting people at younger ages.
 
On a show of hands from Children and Young people in classrooms, aged 13-14, at least half have tried alcohol and about ¼ own up to having been “drunk” in the last  six months.
 
Their art work and image making (shown below), shows a considerable understanding about the effects of alcohol and about the types of strong alcohol available. Though these pictures present a stereotypical view of the “alcoholic”, as dirty and smelly, the presence of alcohol cannot be denied as a social reality in these young people’s lives and families.

Fresh

It is reckoned 1 in 10 of this age group, will develop a problem with alcohol in adulthood.
 
Research from Joseph Rowntree Foundation suggests parents should have a conversation with children and young people about alcohol at least two years earlier than parents usually begin to think about it. Parents often see alcohol as separate from “drugs”, yet alcohol deaths far outnumber deaths from drugs.
 
AA is not set up for Children and Young people under the age of 18, but in Cornwall there are many agencies which can help.  Increasingly AA is working with these agencies.
 
AA is however valuable in planting the seed:  Not to preach to young people but to let them know that help is available to them and their families if the problems with alcohol become too serious.
 
The leaflet and videos below offer more information and a valuable resource for alcohol education
 
If you would like to organise a school talk then please contact the Public Information Officer

LEGAL AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM AND AA


 As a professional coming into contact with alcoholism you will be well aware of its harmful effects on the individual concerned and those around them, particularly the families.


60-70% of men who assault their partners do so under the influence of alcohol and 30% of cases involving child abuse have alcohol as a major contributing factor.


A.A. holds meetings in prisons and co-operates with the Probation Service. The main object of liaising with the Probation Services is to carry the message that AA exists, and that its members are freely available to help those who have got into trouble under the Criminal Justice System because of their drinking.


It is estimated that a significant number of cases coming before the courts involve some element of alcohol abuse, and that many of those appearing is such cases have a history of sentences for re-offending. It is hoped that engagement with AA will provide an opportunity to help reduce this. AA welcomes the opportunity for Probation Officers and Criminal Justice Services workers to consider asking the Fellowship to provide information and help where possible.

CHIT SYSTEM


Please See Meetings Pages for those meetings operating the Chit system for probationers. If you would like any more information about the Chit system and how it works please contact the Probation Liaison Officer. Meetings that allow the Chit system will have Chit written after the meeting details on the Where to Find Meetings and on this website


CORNWALL AA LIAISON WITH DEVON AND CORNWALL POLICE


If you are in the police force or are associated in some way with the service and would like more information about how AA cooperates with the Police Force please contact the Probation Liaison Officer.

THE ARMED FORCES AND AA


 A.A. AND THE ARMED FORCES - WE CAN HELP


If you would like to learn more about how A.A. can serve the Armed Services you can arrange informational talks for Medical Officers, Chaplains, Commanding Officers, or during unit alcohol awareness training, by contacting the Armed Forces Liaison Officer


Within the Armed Services, alcoholism can have a negative impact on unit readiness and morale. Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) may be able to help if there is such a problem in your organisation or among others you may know. Alcoholism can strike anywhere regardless of profession, rank, age, or background.


If you are a professional encountering the negative effects of alcoholism on the productiveness and usefulness of your unit or individual of any rank, A.A. may be able to help. Cooperation with professionals has been a key to the growth of A.A. and its ability to help the still suffering alcoholic since the beginning of the Fellowship.


HOW TO FIND A.A.


If you are a Commanding Officer, Chaplain, Medical Officer, Counsellor, Welfare Worker, Friend, or anyone else who might encounter alcoholism within HM Forces, A.A. wants to make its program of recovery available to you. Since members of the Armed Services are often spread throughout the world, it may be helpful to know that there are A.A. meetings available worldwide. In some cases, groups meet on military installations or in nearby communities. If there are no meetings nearby, help may be found through 'Loners International', a newsletter which our loners receive all over the world.

This contact, as well as letters written and received from A.A. members in other locations, has helped many members in remote areas remain sober. For more information about 'Loners International', local meeting times and locations, or for presentations contact us through email links on this website at the bottom of the page. 


Those who may have a problem with alcohol can attend meetings to learn more about alcoholism and our program of recovery. They can also contact A.A. through the A.A. Helpline number (0800 9177650) or email us for information about local groups or so that someone might arrange to visit the caller.


ARMED SERVICES LIAISON OFFICER


The Armed Forces Liaison Officer is responsible for coordinating and liaising with the armed forces in respect to AA matters. There is a list of ex-armed service AA members who are willing to be contacted when a service person asks for help

THE EMPLOYMENT SECTOR AND AA

Every year in England it is estimated that:
 
17.3 million working days are lost due to alcohol
Absenteeism due to alcohol costs employers £1.8 billion
 
TO EMPLOYERS, MANAGERS AND HR MANAGERS in Cornwall: if you need information on how AA can help you. Contact the Employment Liaison Officer
 
EMPLOYMENT LIAISON OFFICERS  (ELOs)
 
The responsibility of ELOs is to carry AA's message to employers within their local area .
    Employment specifically concerns any organisation employing or serving staff companies, trade unions and associations, government departments and/or related agencies.
 
CO-OPERATION WITH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMMES
 
Experience has shown that A.A. can help in the following ways:


by making posters, literature, local contact numbers and details of local meetings available


offering to talk to staff or management about the AA programme including showing appropriate presentations


by making available the cumulative experience of over two million recovering alcoholics


 by explaining what AA is and how AA can help with the problem of alcoholism in the workplace


by putting employers in direct contact with men and women who have achieved sobriety in AA and who are willing to share their personal experience freely with any problem drinker who seeks help welcoming into the local group the employee who wants to do something about a drinking problem, where he or she will find the environment and friends to help them to achieve sobriety.

AA DOES NOT PLAN OR SET UP ALCOHOLISM PROGRAMMES
 
It is important to establish that AA does not plan or set up alcoholism programmes for industry, rather AA should be presented as a community resource available to the employee with a drinking problem. Bodies such as Alcohol Concern and its affiliated Regional Councils, the Medical Council on Alcohol and the Scottish Council on Alcoholism provide such a service and many AA members are active in the work of these. We are reminded that AA has no opinion on outside issues including alcohol policies but that does not mean we cannot co-operate within our Traditions.

A.A. FOR COUNSELLORS


 As a professional coming into contact with alcoholism, you may not, at first, be aware that it is the cause behind a number of other problems. Denial of a drinking problem is symptomatic of alcoholism. Alcoholic clients tend to be evasive when questioned about their drinking and some counsellors may not recognise that alcoholism is aggravating or even causing the problems that they are presenting.


Clients may resist any that alcoholism is involved and be equally hostile to the suggestion of Alcoholics Anonymous as a last recourse.


A.A. talks to counsellors, therapists and clinical staff can be arranged on request by contacting the Health Liaison Officer

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO GET A.A. HELP FOR A PROBLEM DRINKER?
 
By far the best way to get help is to give them the A.A. telephone number (0800 9177 650) or to call the number while the patient or client is with you and hand them the phone.


The A.A. telephone helpline is manned by A.A. members with at least one year's sobriety who will offer to arrange for a member to contact them to take them to a local meeting.